Tag Archives: advent

wonders of Advent 5 Anna, a prophet sees; holds, shares … fire

19 Dec
light, fire

Prophets hear and speak. They see, hurt for those who hurt God. Those who do not trust and share in the Lord’s love for them. Those who plant their own ways and paths.

Prophets have no such option: they are called to speak the revealed words of the Lord. Their speaking, their voices, are not their own but His. In the Advent story when Mary and Joseph and their child Jesus enter the temple for dedication, two prophets speak to them. First Simeon, then Anna. Here is how Luke’s gospel paints Anna:

36 ‘There was also a prophet, Anna, the daughter of Penuel, of the tribe of Asher. She was very old; she had lived with her husband seven years after her marriage, 37 and then was a widow until she was eighty-four. She never left the temple but worshiped night and day, fasting and praying. 38 Coming up to them at that very moment, she gave thanks to God and spoke about the child to all who were looking forward to the redemption of Jerusalem.’

We do not hear Anna’s exact words. We see her as Mary saw her, how Mary describes this moment to Luke.

Anna is a prophetess, yet we don’t hear her words. What then do we see? Hear?

We see her character: a woman who fasts and prays. A woman who is awaiting redemption. Jesus as redeemer is what we, what Mary sees. An old servant redeemed. Her prays are not wasted; her fasting not overlooked.

And she never stops speaking of Jesus in the temple, even after the baby leaves. She is sharing redemption’s birth with us, redemption’s Advent. This is her prophecy; this is what we, and all in the temple hear: Redemption. And she must, must speak.

The prophet Jeremiah answers this why in his own life description – as he prophesies in Jeremiah 20: 9a

Why? Why must an 84 year old speak to all she comes in contact with?

…’ if I say, “I will not mention his word or speak anymore in his name, his word is in my heart like a fire, a fire shut up in my bones.’

Jeremiah is not just describing himself: he speaks of prophets. He speaks of light and fire; fires and lights.

Our God is a fire: from the burning bush to the day of Pentecost. From Isaiah’s lips being purified with burning coals to the Lord’s fire that consumes Aaron’s two sons. ( Leviticus 10 ) Anna must share because she, as all prophets have fire in their hearts, in their bones.

This prophetic fire always creates light; it opens all to understanding. All to meaning. This fire does not destroy, but reveals.

Anna’s words are fires and lights. They reveal redemption. This, her purifying instrument that opens the Lord’s meaning, is His words; His redeeming words. Her words work with Simeon’s and Jeremiah’s. With the words of all OT prophets.

And as Jeremiah must speak, Anna also cannot be quiet. For she is a light that speaks to all about redemption’s Advent, it’s fire. She shares with all.

Anna prophesies redemption, for all. She speaks ‘Jesus’- she shares Advent light, its fire.

light… light

from Luke 2, wonders of seeing – Advent 2022

9 Dec
light

22 ‘When the time came for the purification rites required by the Law of Moses, Joseph and Mary took him to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord 23 (las it is written in the Law of the Lord, “Every firstborn male is to be consecrated to the Lord” 24 and to offer a sacrifice in keeping with what is said in the Law of the Lord: “a pair of doves or two young pigeons.”

25 Now there was a man in Jerusalem called Simeon, who was righteous and devout. He was waiting for the consolation of Israel, and the Holy Spirit was on him. 26 It had been revealed to him by the Holy Spirit that he would not die before he had seen the Lord’s Messiah. 27 Moved by the Spirit, he went into the temple courts. When the parents brought in the child Jesus to do for him what the custom of the Law required, 28 Simeon took him in his arms and praised God, saying:

29 “Sovereign Lord, as you have promised, you may now dismiss your servant in peace.

30 For my eyes have seen your salvation,

31 which you have prepared in the sight of all nations:

32 a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and the glory of your people Israel.”

33 The child’s father and mother marveled at what was said about him.

34 Then Simeon blessed them and said to Mary, his mother: “This child is destined to cause the falling and rising of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be spoken against, 35 so that the thoughts of many hearts will be revealed. And a sword will pierce your own soul too.”’

How does, what does Simeon, a devout, loving man, see?

He sees, hears by the Spirit. The Spirit reveals to him that he will ‘see’ the Messiah before he dies; after many years of waiting, this same Holy Spirit moves Simeon to the temple courts. And now Simeon sees…

He sees a family consecrating a first born to the Lord. He sees that they bring the most the could, the poorest offering that can be given to the temple; he sees the boy, forty days old; and then he holds Jesus in his arms and prophesies, “For my eyes have seen your salvation, 31 which you have prepared in the sight of all nations: 32 a light for revelation to the Gentiles and the glory of your people Israel.”

He sees salvation; he sees light; he sees God’s glory. He sees and feels the peace of Jesus. Bathed in light, bathed in the Spirit, Simeon shares, prophesies, the light of a promise fulfilled; the Lord’s Messiah-‘salvation.’ Jesus.

Yet, in this moment, Simeon also sees darkness: hearts’ thoughts dark revealed; people rising and falling- Mary’s coming sorrows, a mother’s soul pierced. Darkness.

So, Simeon’s light, his Holy Spirit’s light, reveals sorrows and darkness alongside salvation.

He sees the whole Jesus, the whole story of Advent: light with darkness.

Light.

wonders of advent 2022

28 Nov

light… ‘and you child’

When the prophet Malachi passed around 450 B.C., no genuine prophetic voice was heard again for about 500 years. Darkness.

We know this period as the intertestamental period—the gap between the Old and New Testaments. Without a prophet, people in Israel began to divide into parties and groups- all claiming the right to interpret the scriptures and lead the people. They all desired to lead but each group was in an even deeper darkness than the people who yearned for God’s word, His prophet. A messiah.

Without a prophet darkness deepens. External blackness envelopes not only the outside, but insides of each man woman and child. 450 years of silence has robbed people of hope, joys, and light.

And so, as we look this Advent at the meaning of Jesus’ coming, let us look into this darkness through a light, the light of an unexpected child’s birth, the light of John the Baptist’s birth, … and the words his father prophesied at the light of John’s, his son’s birth … Luke 1: 76-79

‘…And you, child, will be called the prophet of the Most High;

for you will go before the Lord to prepare his ways, to give knowledge of salvation to his people

in the forgiveness of their sins,

78 because of the tender mercy of our God, whereby the sunrise shall visit us from on high

79 to give light to those who sit in darkness and in the shadow of death, to guide our feet into the way of peace.”’

Zaharias a priest, a new father, speaks. Placed in silent darkness because he did not believe the Angel who promised his wife Elizabeth and he a child in their old age, he sat in darkness for nine months. . A priest who cannot speak. A darkened life.

And yet, the child’s birth returns his speech. A renewed life. Light.

He prays, prophesies and holds his John saying, ‘ and you child…’

John will bring prophetic light to the Lord’s people’s. Yet, this is not ‘the sunrise… from on high.’ Jesus. Jesus who brings the light of forgiveness of sin; salvation, tender mercy.

All will no longer sit in darkness. Stationary, passive. No.

He will raise all to their feet and guide. Guide us from darkness’ depths to peace.

Light. From a child. The baby to come.

Jesus. Light.


Advent 2021, ‘he comes’ an epilogue from Mark 15, “…come down from the cross and save yourself!”

20 Dec
Rembrandt ‘Christ on the Cross’ 1631

As we enter Christmas week 2021, I am both returning to the roots of my first ‘Advent Wonder’ 2014 reflections and reversing, turning over in part, these first starts. From the beginning the thought was to build a short, concise yet deepening thought on Advent over a four week period, twice a week. Focused on brevity as people are quite busy during this season, we opened the week on Mondays and closed the week on Fridays with these reflections.


This year I opened Mondays with Old Testament scriptures concerning the Messiah’s coming ( the 2021 series is entitled ‘his coming’ ) and closed Fridays with a corresponding New Testament scripture that contained and deepen Monday’s share.


So, this week of Christmas 2021, I will keep the focused brevity but share the New Testament Messianic words on Monday and the corresponding Old Testament one on Friday. Why?
Because this week He is no longer ‘coming’ but Jesus is here, He comes. So, we go today, not to a manger but to Jesus on the cross…

29 Those who passed by hurled insults at him, shaking their heads and saying, “So! You who are going to destroy the temple and build it in three days, 30 come down from the cross and save yourself!” 31 In the same way the chief priests and the teachers of the law mocked him among themselves. “He saved others,” they said, “but he can’t save himself!32 Let this Messiah, this king of Israel, come down now from the cross, that we may see and believe.” Those crucified with him also heaped insults on him.

The last prayers of Jesus’ torturers, his murders is for Him to ‘come down.’
Praying, looking, pleading for a Messiah to come for hundreds of years, without a touch of self awareness and knowledge, they repeat this prayer for Jesus ‘to come.’ But they want him to ‘come down.’ They want a Jesus that fits their preconceived ideas of a Messiah. They say they want ‘to see’ but they are blind.


Blind to the fact that their, our, Messiah has come to a cross, by way of a manger, for all. He walked, ate, taught and spoke with them. He prayed for them. Yet, they still prayed for Him to ‘come down.’

Sadly, they do not see.


He comes, but some cannot see. Sadly, they see not.


My prayer: Lord, my Jesus, help me to see you, more and more, all days. Let me see you more. Come.

Advent 4, his coming: why he comes; why he came

17 Dec
Jesus comes to Paul

from Romans 1:16 ‘For I am not ashamed of the gospel, because it is the power of God that brings salvation to everyone who believes: first to the Jew, then to the Gentile.’


Why did Jesus come to earth? What do we celebrate, really celebrate, at Christmas, at Advent? What is this, his coming, meaning?


Paul’s writings and life reflect the purpose, the depth and breath, of Advent. His life is Advent’s scope.


A serial murderer; a destroyer of lives, of life; a hater, Paul has a great deal to be ashamed of.But he is not. He believes that his murdering of the innocent is not a good thing but the best of actions. Paul is killing for his Pharisaical beliefs with love. He is killing fo his faith.


Yet, Jesus enters; Paul is spoken to; thrown off his killing Damascus journey; blinded for 3 days; and embraced by a Christian and healed. Paul can know see Jesus and the gospel truth: Jesus came for him.
And what is the ultimate purpose of Jesus’ coming? It is to remove all sin, and all of the shame of sin, from our lives. Both sin and its seemingly enduring shames are totally removed.


Paul is not ashamed of the gospel because he – a serial murderer – is not ashamed of himself.


Jesus comes at Advent for Paul, He comes for me. He comes to remove sin and its shames. He comes as a newborn to create newborns. He comes to create Paul from Saul.
Paul writes on this coming to his adopted son, in 1 Timothy 1:


15 Here is a trustworthy saying that deserves full acceptance: Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners —of whom I am the worst. 16 But for that very reason I was shown mercy so that in me, the worst of sinners, Christ Jesus might display his immense patience as an example for those who would believe in him and receive eternal life. 17 Now to the King eternal, immortal, invisible, the only God, be honor and glory for ever and ever. Amen.

and…


14 The grace of our Lord was poured out on me abundantly, along with the faith and love that are in Christ Jesus.

Advent is a time to prepare for His coming, His pouring out of grace, and faith and healing love. And it is poured out ‘abundantly’ or as a previous NIV translation states, in ‘overflow.’


Jesus comes, pours, washes, heals in such overflow that sin and its shames are no more. Advent is a time of reflecting and meditating on His overflow. He comes.

My prayer: Lord, I worship you for you overflow … not just for me, but for all. For even the worst of sinners. Come, overflow, my Lord. Come.

advent 4, his coming ‘O You who listen to prayer, all people will come to You.’ from Psalm 65:2

13 Dec

Each of these past four Mondays our 2021 Advent series ‘advent 4, his coming’ has focused on Old Testament scriptures that specifically reference the Messiah’s coming. Looking to an unknown future time, prophets prayed and spoke as messengers of Him; people waited, in moments patiently and at times in anger. But all looked for a coming. Today I sit with you and meditate on this prayerful desire of the past, for our Saviour ‘to come.’

What does it mean this, 2021 Holiday season, to the church, to people, to expect a ‘coming?’

First, consider, how many family members have not been together for over a year due to the pandemic: untold numbers desire friends and family members to be, to come together. There is pain in silences and absences, in the lack of comings, the invitations not given or accepted. And the pandemic is not the only reason there is no voiced request, ‘come to my house.’ And some families are fractured, broken. There is no invitations; no comings.


I have a friend who has not seen their grandchildren or children in over a year. The pandemic and unforgiving of past hurts has isolated them from family, from friendship. The other day they spoke, prayerfully, of the desire to be invited in. They would drop everything to go in response. Why?
They do desire to be asked to come. To see babies and children. Friends and family.
And yet, think, how much more did the shepherds and the Magi; the angels and the prophets of Jesus’ time desire for the Messiah, the Saviour to come,…?
Deeply, they desire His Advent, His coming. Even more than family or country, as the Magi who left all to see… even more than their sheep and livelihood, as shepherds who left Bethlehem’s fields…and even more than angels who leave heaven for earth to sing of their and our Emmanuel.

Our Lord promises, not just that he will come in response to prayers, but we will also come to him, Psalm 65 states this,
‘O You who listen to prayer, all people will come to You.’ and from another pray filled Psalm,

Psalm 86:9
‘All the nations You have made will come and bow before You, O Lord, and they will glorify Your name.’

Family and friends may be too hurting, or to frightened of Covid to invite others this season to come to them.

But our Lord not only invites us in but also comes down from the heavens to come to us.


He promises to invite us in and to come. Always. He comes in answer to prayers and praise as we glorify his name. He comes.


My prayer: Emmanuel, come. Be with all the uninvited, the hurting, the lonely.
Come.

Advent 3, his coming, his weeping …’

6 Dec
a tear


‘For I desire mercy, not sacrifice, and acknowledgment of God rather than burnt offerings.’
Hoses 6:6;

‘But go and learn what this means: ‘I desire mercy, not sacrifice.’ For I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners.”’ Matthew 9:13

The New Testament, the words of Jesus’ teaching and living, call out the essences of the Old Testament. Jesus brings these older scriptures to new life, renewed meanings. A new coming: an Advent. A Messiah’s journey.


Jesus quotes a one specific Old Testament book twice at the beginnings of his Messianic journey, the book of Hosea.
There are two central strands in the project’s Hosea’s text. The first is his call by the Lord to marry Gomer, a prostitute, this is the story strand of Hosea’s life: his call to marry; their children; Gomer’s painful unfaithfulness and her return to prostitution and then in closing Hosea’s forgiveness and his loving redemption of the unfaithful, or: mercy.
And the second strand is a clear raison d’être of why Hosea is so called to supernatural mercy. Our lord loves us because we are his. And Hosea 11 describes this merciful overflowing love,

from Hosea 11

“When Israel was a child, I loved him,
and out of Egypt I called my son.
2 But the more they were called,
the more they went away from me.
They sacrificed to the Baals
and they burned incense to images.


3 It was I who taught Ephraim to walk,
taking them by the arms;
but they did not realize
it was I who healed them.
4 I led them with cords of human kindness,
with ties of love.
To them I was like one who lifts
a little child to the cheek,
and I bent down to feed them.

Just as a child does not fully comprehend how their parents walk with and for them; how a father leads and a mother lifts them to their cheek and how parents bend down to feed them, so the Jewish people did not know who is loving them. They don’t see or hear the Jesus before them. Why? Hosea continues his sharing the Lord’s words to his people, beginning with a question,

“Will they not return to Egypt and will not Assyria rule over them because they refuse to repent?

6 A sword will flash in their cities;
it will devour their false prophets
and put an end to their plans.
7 My people are determined to turn from me.
Even though they call me God Most High,
I will by no means exalt them.

Here, the Lord describes his leaving the unfaithful to Egypt and Assyria; to the idols of Baals and images they worship. Images that form idols in their own hearts. Their own idols block their hearts and eyes; ears and spirits from seeing and hearing. And if left in their Gomer like state, they will always be unloved; or never experiencing the Lord’s mercy.

But our Lord then asks another question, first, for himself and then also of Ephraim, for their healing and restoration, 

8 “How can I give you up, Ephraim?
How can I hand you over, Israel?
How can I treat you like Admah?
How can I make you like Zeboyim?(
My heart is changed within me;
all my compassion is aroused

Not some, or most but all of the Lord’s compassions are aroused. His heart is changed within him. In the Hebrew this type of change strongly implies ‘crying.’ So, the Lord of the universe loves us so so much, He cries, deeply, over us.

This is the first time in the scriptures we see The Lord crying. And who is it over?

It is over Gomers; and Ephraim; over you and me.

This is mercy: tears for the unfaithful and for the hurting. It is all His compassion, all. We are precious because He weeps over us, all.

My prayer: Lord please welcome me into your hands, your loving healing protective hands, no matter how I may fail you. Love me as I fail. Let your tears wash me. 


2; two, his advent, his coming

3 Dec

2 Corinthians 9:15 ‘Thanks be to God for his indescribable gift!’

Paul is always attempting to describe his experiences with the Lord. From his fall on the road to Damascus to his immediate blindness; from his journeys to Jerusalem, Corinth, Colossi etc.; to his stay in Arabia restudying the scriptures. In all his letters, his writings and his speeches, Paul seeks to describe the indescribable: the gift of the gospel – Jesus’ coming as both the the proclaimer and the proclamation, the gospel made flesh itself.

People respond to this indescribable gospel in many different ways. For example, some, when approached by the idea of a miraculous birth, are stuck mute ( Zechariah in Luke 1 ) while others sing as the Angels of Bethlehem’s fields. Some see those being released from demon possession as a miracle, while others see the work to the evil one himself. ( Matthew 12: 22-28 )

The good news of the gospel evokes then many diverse reactions, from fisherman immediately leaving their nets to angels stopping down from the heavens to reflect continually ( 1 Peter 1: 12 Weymouth New Testament )

But, what about the messenger? the proclaimer? As Jesus handles the precious gift of the gospel, his words and his actions; his heart and mind; and even His physical body, reveal essential attributes of the gospel, the gift . As Jesus answers John the Baptist’s disciples when they ask, Are you the one?

Jesus replied, “Go back and report to John what you hear and see:

This is how Jesus reveals, proclaims the gospel: by His actions and His words. He is both messenger and the message at the same moment.

And Luke tells us how Jesus views both His mission and the good news of the gospel, ( 4 )

40 ‘ At sunset, the people brought to Jesus all who had various kinds of sickness, and laying his hands on each one, he healed them. 41 Moreover, demons came out of many people, shouting, “You are the Son of God!” But he rebuked them and would not allow them to speak,because they knew he was the Messiah.

42 At daybreak, Jesus went out to a solitary place. The people were looking for him and when they came to where he was, they tried to keep him from leaving them. 43 But he said, “I must proclaim the good news of the kingdom of God to the other towns also, because that is why I was sent.” 44 And he kept on preaching in the synagogues of Judea.’

On this, His first journey after being tempted by the evil one in the desert and then rejected and driven out of his hometown, Jesus moves on. And His moving, His unstoppable coming journeys reveal the gospel: God so loved the world He must proclaim the Kingdom of love and mercy to all.

In Capernaum and surrounding towns Jesus heals at sunset; and He prays at the sunrise in a solitary space. He is at His Father’s, and their collective works: loving us.

We both are the receivers of the indescribable gift of the Gospel and the transformed of the gift. That is whom the angels stoop to see: us, living out the good news. And Capernaum’s people show us power of indescribable gift. They never want to see their gift leave.

Now, instead of threatening and driving Jesus away, the peoples come to Him and try to restrain Jesus from leaving them. And how does Jesus respond to outpouring, this overflow of love? He leaves. Why? He tells them,

“I must proclaim the good news of the kingdom of God to the other towns also, because that is why I was sent.”

Jesus must leave this love feast because his mission is to proclaim. He must go. I am sure that his leaving was one of his daybreak prayer concerns. It is hard, so hard to leave those who love you, especially after trials and rejections. But leave Jesus must.

His proclaiming the good news of His, of our Kingdom, is why He was sent. The indescribable gift of the gospel is both the proclaimer and the message. And both have to be sent out. And to us. So,

44 “And he kept on preaching in the synagogues of Judea.”

Jesus’ words are still read and taught; still mediated on and spoken aloud.

So is his life. Why?

Because ‘ he kept on ‘. He kept on giving, giving, living, the Gospel. Even to the cross where he died for it, for us.

My prayer: daily my Lord, help me to see more, to stoop down deeper, into understanding the indescribable…

Our life with Him; the Gospel.

Matthew 11: 15 ‘He who has ears, yet him hear.’

advent 2021, his coming, week 2 – Jesus’ proclaims

29 Nov
Jesus’ sharing from Isaiah

Recently, I was in a church and a lyric from one of the worship songs was, “I speak Jesus; over every heart and mind”

The story of Advent is the the story of how Jesus’ name was given, spoken in essence, proclaimed, proclaimed to all.

In my two Advent reflections last week, we looked at the nature of Messiah by examining Old Testament peoples’ expectations of the promised Messiah/Saviour ( a king leader; mighty warrior of justice ). Yet, the Old Testament also hints at another attribute of the Messiah, that of a marred, suffering servant.

Our Jesus comes to proclaim that these two views are not in opposition to each other but, that in an essential truth, they describe in unity the Messiah with us: a servant warrior. Jesus.

And how is our Messiah to both serve and fight for righteousness, for justice, for us? Jesus teaches with parables and probing questions; Jesus eats and sit with sinners; Jesus heals and comforts, challenges and accepts questioning. But Jesus primary purpose as he seeks the lost is proclaim the good news, the gospel.

By Old Testament proclamation and prophecy, Jesus comes as Messiah; by proclaming Jesus speaks, claims the truth. And when he is in public teaching, Jesus calls to and claims his people, his sheep, his kingdom. When Jesus proclaims, He is fulfilling

Isaiah’s prophesy of the coming Messiah is as one who proclaims,

61 ‘The Spirit of the Sovereign Lord is on me because the Lord has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor.

He has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim freedom for the captives and release from darkness for the prisoners,

2 to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favour…’

As in a worship song’s chorus that repeats as in a prayer a key verses over and over again, ( I speak (( proclaim )) Jesus ), Isaiah repeats the key verbal action of the Messiah: to proclaim.

Webster’s dictionary defines proclamation as, – ‘to declare publicly, typically insistently, proudly, or defiantly and in either speech or writing’

A proclaimer then speaks a message strongly, as a leader warrior. Proclaiming is a specific speech genre. Not an indirect message as in a parable, but a direct message of import. Speaking forcefully, a proclaimer reveals the truth to all. And Jesus comes to proclaim good news, favour, love. He comes to proclaim the radical gospel of love of God, love for neighbours, and love of the lost.

Jesus comes as the Word, the proclaimed word so that His love can became the life, the flesh of all.

My prayer: help us, help me, to listen my Jesus. Listen.

Advent Wonder 2021, reflection 2, ‘his coming’ – the suffering warrior

26 Nov
Magi

Jesus’ coming was a living and troubling paradox for the people of his time. Was he to be a great warrior king who comes to lead? Or was the Messiah to be a servant who teaches, heals and loves as he serves?

Peoples of the Mid East, those belonging to the Magi’s Asian country, the Greeks, the Romans, all believed in warrior Messiahs, all powerful Gods. In principle, their common belief was that an all powerful King/priest would appear and lead all to a safe place, a kingdom, of righteousness and peace.

The Magi are exemplars of such a belief. ( Matthew 2 )A group of scholars who studied skies and ancient scrolls as their family and community directed for centuries, believed that a great warrior king from the heavens would come to earth to be worshipped as the chosen to make all wrongs right.

The Old Testament describes such a warrior king in paradox, as both a warrior and a suffering servant: ( Isaiah 42:13 “The Lord will march out like a champion, like a warrior he will stir up his zeal; with a shout he will raise the battle cry and will triumph over his enemies.”

But Isaiah also depicts a suffering servant as Messiah – ( “he was despised and rejected by mankind, a man of suffering, and familiar with pain” Isaiah 53: 12 ).

How can a Saviour Messiah be both warrior and a servant? Jesus shows us how at the beginning of his ministry in his hometown Nazareth’s synagogue, ( from Luke 4 )

“And Jesus returned in the power of the Spirit to Galilee, and a report about him went out through all the surrounding country. 15 And he taught in their synagogues, being glorified by all. 16 And he came to Nazareth, where he had been brought up. And as was his custom, he went to the synagogue on the Sabbath day, and he stood up to read. 17 And the scroll of the prophet Isaiah was given to him. He unrolled the scroll and found the place where it was written, 18

“The Spirit of the Lord is upon me because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor.

He has sent me to proclaim liberty to the captive and recovering of sight to the blind to set at liberty those who are oppressed,19 to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor.” 20 And he rolled up the scroll and gave it back to the attendant and sat down. And the eyes of all in the synagogue were fixed on him. 21 And he began to say to them, “Today this Scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing.” 22 And all spoke well of him and marveled at the gracious words that were coming from his mouth….

Jesus boldly picks up Isaiah’s scroll and reads the prophetic description of a Messiah who will come to heal, to make wrongs right, and to proclaim the year of Jubilee, of favour.

Here,as a warrior teacher, Jesus then follows his reading by sitting and breathing these words, “Today this Scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing.”

Speaking his words with Isaiah’s can only be heard, seen as Jesus laying claim to being the Messiah. But what type of Messiah? The text describing the people’s reactions reveals the, this Saviour’s nature:

At first the people of his hometown are excited and in awe at his words. But when his words challenge their past understanding of the warrior Messiah, their hearts and minds reverse from awe to anger,

….all in the synagogue were filled with wrath. 29 And they rose up and drove him out of the town and brought him to the brow of the hill on which their town was built, so that they could throw him down the cliff. 30 But passing through their midst, he went away.”

Such a Saviour, such a Messiah, wars against brokenness by speaking with truth- the whole complete truth: the saviour will suffer and heal; the saviour will be a lamb before the slaughter and a zealous might warrior; our saviour will come as the word made flesh: the way, the truth, the light …

And he does it by risking rejection and brokenness himself. He does it to be experiencing death and resurrection.

He comes to complete and solve our greatest paradox: by dying in belief, I live. From everlasting to everlasting, I will live with Him.

my prayer: come this 2021 Advent to us, to me, again my Jesus; deepen my understanding of how your love answers all paradoxes.

Come my Jesus, come.